Incidents

Unknown 2012-11-06 00:00:00 UTC

Justin Soyke2012-11-01 00:00:00 UTC

Unknown attacks associated with anonymous.

Deniss Calovskis2012-11-01 00:00:00 UTC

Helped develop code that increased the virus effectiveness by altering the appearance of banks websites, tricking victims into divulging their information, prosecutors said.

Barrett Brown2012-09-12 00:00:00 UTC

Accused of making threats to police, assisting in the stratfor hack with lulzsec and various other allegations related to posting links. Raided during a live tiny chat session.

Alexis Carthens2012-09-10 00:00:00 UTC

assisted Ricardo Rosario, in running a stolen and fake id stie

David Rezendes2012-08-27 00:00:00 UTC

accused of ddos attacks

Raynaldo Rivera2012-08-22 00:00:00 UTC

sccused memeber of lulzsec

James Goodwill2012-08-21 00:00:00 UTC

Cambridgeshire Police officer attracted to a female witness used force computer system to obtain her phone number.

Thomas Dye2012-08-21 00:00:00 UTC

Accused of being a founding member of the alleged fake market place for applications Appbucket.

Nicholas Narbone2012-08-21 00:00:00 UTC

Accused of being a founding member of the alleged fake market place for applications Appbucket.

Thomas Pace2012-08-21 00:00:00 UTC

Accused of being a founding member of the alleged fake market place for applications Appbucket. Was primarily responsible for finding copies of Android apps and managing the site’s servers.

Astrid Curzon2012-08-17 00:00:00 UTC

Business manager of Royal Wootton Bassett Academy had recently been made redundant when she accessed the school’s email system using the login and password of another school employee and read private emails from the Head.

Alexander Mihailovski2012-08-01 00:00:00 UTC

accused of being apart of a multi million dollr scareware scheme

Nikhil Kolbekar2012-07-11 00:00:00 UTC

allegedly trafficked in fulls. In an effort to enhance his reputation as a carder, Kolbekar “dumped,” or provided free access to, more than 75 usernames and passwords for stolen accounts at Facebook, Gmail, Hotmail, Yahoo, AOL, MySpace, and other online services on the site in June 2010. Kolbekar also offered to sell “RDPs” to assist others in hacking computers internationally. RDP is a reference to “remote desktop protocol,” a program that hackers sometimes use to access and gain control of another person’s computer remotely. In April 2011, Kolbekar offered to sell RDPs—specifically, the computer IP address, username, and password combinations—that could be used to hack into computers in Spain, Sweden, Italy, France, Gernmany, Brazil, South Africa, the Czech Republic, India, and Turkey.

Justin Mills2012-07-11 00:00:00 UTC

Trafficked in “logs,” a term used by carders to refer to stolen username and password combinations for online accounts. At one point, Mills told the administrator of the site that he had 170,000 logs for sale and that he obtained the logs through a form of malicious software called “iStealer,” which steals website login information stored in the victim’s Internet browser application. Mills also used the Internet to sell a host of electronics and other items he obtained through carding, including Sony laptop computers, iPads, and Express.com gift cards. In April 2011, in response to an Internet posting seeking advice on how to make “1,000 a month or more” from carding, Mills replied, “1k a month? If you need suggestions, I can show you some ways to get that in a week.”

Nikhil Pable2012-07-02 00:00:00 UTC

Pable would hack into websites of well-known software companies, illegally download their software and then make multiple copies of them for sale in India.

Pavel Cyganok2012-07-02 00:00:00 UTC

SpyEye trojan used to steal login credentials for online banking accounts and then uploaded to servers controlled by Cyganok and Zakrevski. Tip-off by Estonian Police led Metropolitan Polices Central E-Crime Unit PCEU to seize one of the UK-based servers. An estimated 1,000 computers had been infected with victims in the UK, Denmark, The Netherlands and New Zealand.

Ilja Zakrevski2012-07-02 00:00:00 UTC

SpyEye trojan used to steal login credentials for online banking accounts and then uploaded to servers controlled by Cyganok and Zakrevski. Tip-off by Estonian Police led Metropolitan Polices Central E-Crime Unit PCEU to seize one of the UK-based servers. An estimated 1,000 computers had been infected with victims in the UK, Denmark, The Netherlands and New Zealand.

Eric Bogle2012-07-02 00:00:00 UTC

Sold “fulls,” a term used by carders to refer to full credit card data including cardholder name, address, Social Security number, birth date, mother’s maiden name, and bank account information. In October 2010, he offered to sell fulls for expired, stolen accounts for $2 each, claiming that the account data could be used to open fraudulent accounts at billmelater.com, an online credit service, or for “many other uses.”

Mir Islam2012-06-27 00:00:00 UTC

Activities related to carding, association with UGNazi, swatting, harrassment and other cyber crimes.

Christian Cangeopol2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

engaged in illegal “instoring” at Walmart to obtain Apple electronic devices with stolen credit cards. Instoring is a term used by carders to refer to using stolen credit card accounts to make in-store, as opposed to online, purchases of items using stolen credit card information and matching fake identifications. As part of the alleged scheme, Cangeopol and a co-conspirator used stolen credit card data to order electronic devices on Walmart’s website; in selecting a delivery option, they opted to have items delivered to various Walmart stores in Georgia; Cangeopol then picked up the items using a fake identification; Cangeopol and the co-conspirator then resold the carded electronics and split the proceeds.

Mark Caparelli2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

engaged in a so-called “Apple call-in” scheme in which he used stolen credit cards and social engineering skills to fraudulently obtain replacement products from Apple Inc., which he then resold for profit.The scheme involved Caparelli obtaining serial numbers of Apple products he had not bought. He would then call Apple with the serial number, claim the product was defective, arrange for a replacement product to be sent to an address he designated, and give Apple a stolen credit card number to charge if he failed to return the purportedly defective product. Caparelli sold and shipped four iPhone 4 cell phones that he had stolen through the Apple call-in scheme to an individual whom he believed to be a fellow-carder, but who, in fact, was an undercover FBI agent.

Steven Hansen2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

Sold stolen CVVs, a term used by carders to refer to credit card data that includes the name, address, and zip code of the card holder, along with the card number, expiration date, and security code printed on the card.

Sean Harper2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

Sold drop services to other carders in return for money or carded merchandise. Harper provided drop addresses in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to which co-conspirators sent expensive electronics, jewelry, and clothing, among other things.

Ali Hassan2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

Sold “fulls,” a term used by carders to refer to full credit card data including cardholder name, address, Social Security number, birthdate, mother’s maiden name, and bank account information. Hassan claimed to have obtained at least some of them by having hacked into an online hotel booking site

Alex Hatala2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

Hatala advertised to fellow carders that he got “fresh” CVVs on a “daily” basis from hacking into “DBs [databases] around the world

Joshua Hicks2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

Sold “dumps,” which is a term used by carders to refer to stolen credit card data in a form in which the data is stored on the magnetic strips on the backs of credit cards. Hicks sold 15 credit card dumps in return for a camera and $250 in cash to a fellow carder who, unbeknownst to Hicks, was an undercover FBI agent. Hicks met the undercover agent in downtown Manhattan to consummate the sale.

Michael Hogue2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

Offered malware for sale, including remote access tools RATs that allowed the user to take over and remotely control the operations of an infected victim-computer. Hogue’s RAT, for example, enabled the user to turn on the web camera on victims’ computers to spy on them and to record every keystroke of the victim-computer’s user. If the victim visited a banking website and entered his or her user name and password, the key logging program could record that information, which could then be used to access the victim’s bank account. Hogue sold his RAT widely over the Internet, usually for $50 per copy and boasted that he had personally infected “50-100” computers with his RAT and that he’d sold it to others who had infected “thousands” of computers with malware. Hogue’s RAT infected computers in the United States, Canada, Germany, Denmark, Poland, and possibly other countries.

Lee Juesheng2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

Sold “dumps,” which is a term used by carders to refer to stolen credit card data in a form in which the data is stored on the magnetic strips on the backs of credit cards. Sold 119 credit card dumps in return for three iPad 2s to a carder who was an undercover FBI agent. Jeusheng provided his shipping address in Japan to the undercover agent, which in part led to his identification and arrest.

Peter Ketchum Jr2012-06-26 00:00:00 UTC

Ketchum advertised drop locations “spread across multiple cities” in the United States and allegedly received and shipped carded merchandise including sunglasses and air purifiers, as well as synthetic marijuana.