Incidents

Malcolm Farquharson1993-12-09 00:00:00 UTC

co accused with emma Pearce

Emma Pearce1993-12-09 00:00:00 UTC

Mobile phone cloning. Accused instructed by Farquharson to access telephone records see R v Farquharson. Defendant convicted. £300 fine.

Randal Schwartz1993-11-01 00:00:00 UTC

cracked ten to twelve passwords on intel systems while working for them. February 1, 2007 his arrest and conviction records were sealed through an official expungement and he is legally no longer a felon

Vatsal Patel1993-07-15 00:00:00 UTC

Contract programmer alleged to have deleted software development files to prolong his contract. "Wrecking programs" ran automatically in background to delete software development teams work. Held - evidence of file directory entries was admissible, and that doubts on its reliability go to weight of evidence. Defendant acquitted first Computer Misuse Act 1990, s 3 acquittal after trial.

Elaine Borg1993-03-17 00:00:00 UTC

a computer systems programmer at City firm Henderson Financial Investment services. Her plan was devised together with a male partner, who was a known criminal, based in Spain. She set up dummy accounts on the computer system, into which stock could be transferred and a fraudulent sale effected. caught when police investigating her partner, discovered her relationship with him. The City of London fraud department monitored her telephone calls, and she was heard discussing the plan. She was convicted at Snaresbrook Crown Court on March 17 this year. The charges were conspiracy to steal, and unauthorised access to computer material with intent to commit further offence.

Alfred Whittaker1993-01-01 00:00:00 UTC

Alfred Whittaker MD of AAS Managment systems was found guilty at Scunthorpe Magistrates Court under section 3 of the Computer missues act when it was shown he had put a time lock into software supplied to Protech Formulations. Mr Whittaker was given a conditional discharge which is effectivly the minimum sentance that the Magistrates could give. The case all hung on the fact that Mr Whittaker admitted what he had done but could not show for obvious reasons that Protech had agreed to the software modification time lock that subsiquently denied Protech Formulations access to "their data" thus his actions where "unautherised" and fell within the scope of section three.